A management-based typology for European permanent grasslands

A management-based typology for European permanent grasslands
A management-based typology for European permanent grasslands

Authors: Tonn B.1, Bausson C.2, Ten Berge H.3, Buchmann N.4, Bufe C.3, Eggers S.5, FernĂĄndez-Rebollo P.6, Forster-Brown C.7, Hiron M.5, Klaus V.H.4, Korevaar H.3, Lellei-KovĂĄcs E.8, Lombardi G.9, Markovic B.10, Ravetto Enri S.9, Schils R.L.M.3, Stypinski P.11 and Newell Price P.12

1University of Göttingen, Department of Crop Sciences, Germany; 2Chambre rĂ©gionale d’agriculture de Normandie, France; 3Wageningen Plant Research, Agrosystems Research, the Netherlands; 4ETH ZĂŒrich, Department of Environmental Systems Science, Switzerland; 5Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Sweden; 6University of CĂłrdoba, Department of Forestry, Spain; 7ADAS Medenvale, United Kingdom; 8MTA Centre for Ecological Research, Institute of Ecology and Botany, Hungary; 9University of Turin, Department of Agricultural Forest and Food Sciences, Italy; 10University of Montenegro, Department of Livestock Science, Montenegro; 11Warsaw University of Life Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Biology, Poland; 12ADAS Gleadthorpe, United Kingdom

Abstract
European permanent grasslands (PG) vary widely in their delivery of agricultural outputs and other ecosystem services and hence in their challenges and opportunities for sustainable grassland management. To facilitate communication and knowledge transfer, improve inventories, ease mapping and provide a framework for future data collection across the whole range of European PG, we have developed a two-level grassland typology that focuses on PG management  defoliation, fertilisation, renewal) and its determinants (productivity potential, presence of woody plants, additional site attributes affecting management). The typology consists of eight first-level and 18 subordinate second-level classes, based on management intensity, productivity potential, presence of woody plants and grassland renewal intervals. It is applicable both at field and regional scales and is cross-referenced with existing classification schemes such as the EUNIS and Natura 2000 habitats classes. We present the typology and its main classification criteria, and discuss options for its future implementation.

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